ponchopeligroso:

every single person you know has something in their life and past that is probably worth collapsing to the ground in an uncontrollably sobbing heap over, so be nice to each other and tell good jokes

(via ikilledalaska)

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

i prefer girls with the natural look. no makeup, never gotten a haircut, covered in dirt, feeding off of berries and raw fish in the wild, are actually bears.

(via algenubi)

iamaslumberbatch:

a-lot-like-diana:

so basically when you have your period and your lower back hurts it is because your hips are contracting and spreading apart, only slightly, to make room for the release of the blood and linings of your uterus. so basically your body is going through a small and mild labor to push out the dead insides of your uterus. so basically I have gone through labor and basically I don’t want children. 

why aren’t we taught this shit

(via boxedasianpasta)

Anonymous asked:

you only want quality time? what about your wishlist?

My wishlist is extraneous—anything on it would be just the cherry on top, not the main event. It was originally compiled for my best friend who refused to not get me a gift on my 21st birthday. I prioritize the time I spend and conversations I have with people over the things that they give me.

Things are replaceable. Time is not.

My primary love language in terms of receiving is quality time.

Having so many people ask me what I wanted for my birthday was overwhelming, to say the least. They expected me to just tell them to buy me something, but realistically speaking, things are replaceable. They don’t last. They rarely hold much significance. If I really need it, I’ll get it myself. If I can’t obtain it through my own means, I’m not above asking for it, so you know that I would… but at this moment, I don’t really need anything.

Just give me your time. Your time is the most valuable thing you can give me. We could go on an adventure in the city, or we don’t even have to be doing something particularly interesting. Tell me about your day, your passions, your aspirations, your worries, etc. over some coffee, and I will be more than content. If you really feel the need to spend money on me, feel free to buy me the coffee or meal that would accompany our time together. But know that your presence and our conversations are what I will remember, not how bitter the coffee was unless I get early-onset Alzheimer’s when I’m 30 and then you’re going to have to see me every day just remind me that you exist and that we’re the best of friends.